You're never too old for a fairy tale

Do you remember how fairy tales affected you as a child? Young braided Gretel pushing the witch into the oven, to save her brother Hansel? Birds that ate the breadcrumbs? Children lost in the darkest thickest part of the forest? A princess who would not let a frog sleep in her bed? The odd name, Rumpelstiltskin?

A Little Fairy Tale History…

Until the 1690’s fairy tales were only told by non-literate peasants who worked in fields or held a job in a spinning room. France did not believe these tales worthy of being transcribed into literature, until the rise of the literary folk tale in France. Highly educated aristocratic women began organizing salons in Paris. The teller of the tale had to appear as if the tale was being made up on the spot. These tales were written down and recorded. Writers were not allowed to directly criticize Louis XIV due to censorship, and so the fairy tale became a means to project hope towards the future.

How about a little fairy tale about George Bush or Dick Cheney? You can make it up! Start your own fairy tale salon!

To get inspired…

Theater of the Grasshopper presents Mutti’s After Supper Stories-six Grimm’s fairy tale adaptations that stay close to the haunting and very scary originals. Noelle McGrath De Paula performs with her three children, Juliet, Colin, and Lily. Creepy lullabies are performed by Hugh Hales-Tooke.

October 10, 11, & 12th

Payan Theatre/Roy Arias Theater Center
300 West 43rd St. (near 8th ave.)
5th floor
New York, NY 10036
212-677-8078

  • http://sapidexistence.com Chris Osborne

    Hmm, I didn’t know that bit about literate people not knowing fairy tales. That’s sort of cool.